Rhode Island is “State Number Eight” to Pass Paid Sick Leave Law

The wait for “State Number Eight” to pass a paid sick leave law is over. Rhode Island has claimed that title.

The Rhode Island General Assembly convened yesterday for a “cleanup session” to deal with some bills that were pending when the regular session ended. During the regular session, both the Senate and the House had passed paid sick leave bills, but the session ended before they were reconciled. Yesterday, both the House and the Senate passed a compromise bill. Governor Gina Raimondo has said previously that she supports paid sick leave and is expected to sign the bill, which would be effective July 1, 2018.eight-33992_1280

A few observations about the bill:

  • Employees accrue one hour of leave for every 35 hours worked. In the other states, the accrual rate is one hour for every 30 or 40 hours worked.
  • The maximum annual accrual ramps up from 24 hours in 2018, to 32 in 2019, and to 40 for later calendar years.
  • For a foreseeable need to use leave, the bill requires employees “to schedule the use of sick and safe leave time in a manner that does not unduly disrupt the operations of the employer,” a concept in the Americans with Disabilities Act.
  • Meeting the “safe harbor” requirements will likely be easier compared to other states because employers who offer the required amount of annual time off are excused from complying with some of the bill’s procedural requirements.
  • The bill has the most comprehensive provisions concerning fraudulent use of PSL of any PSL law in the country.
  • The bill makes Rhode Island a preemption state. A “uniformity” clause prohibits municipalities from requiring employers to provide more paid sick and safe time than is required by the bill.

The Rhode Island bill is the first PSL bill of 2017. Albuquerque voters will be voting on a PSL initiative in two weeks, on October 3.